Human Genome Research Summaries

Written by Damien Knight

2011

 

DeSalle, Rob, and Michael Yudell. Welcome to the genome: a user’s guide to the genetic past, present, and future. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Liss, 2005. Print.

 

Welcome to the Genome: A User’s Guide to  the Past, Present, and Future is a basic introductory to the relatively new field of genomics and its influence on human social and political issues.  Genomics is a merge of many sciences biology included.  The science of genomics started with the ideas of heredity and where we come from. What are our differences or similarities? The answers it came upon were startling. It discussed how race is not biologically supported.  To understand the human genome one has to understand DNA and genetics. Without an understanding of what the building blocks of life were one cannot go forward into genetics. The Human genome itself contains 3 billion units of DNA code that defines the human species. The human genome is 99.9% identical.  Several things had to push the science forward, first basic sequencing of DNA. Then the capability to read the genetic code had to be developed. After which we had to understand how DNA was made. After all this is done we go from examining genes to sequencing the human genome.  The book touches social issues that could be caused by genomics such as genetic discrimination. Still the study of the human genome may help make great strides in the field of medicine. The book also covers how legislation is being made to prevent misuse of genetic information.

The authors are Rob Desalle and Micheal Yudell. Rob Desalle  and Micheal Yudell both have worked at the American Museum of Natural History. Desalle presently works at the Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics and has assisted in several books on DNA and genetics. Yudell works presently as an assistant professor in the Department of Community Health and Prevention at Drexel University. Like Desalle he has worked on several other books involving the study of DNA. His primary focus is on genetics and health. Welcome to the Genome: A User’s Guide to  the Past, Present, and Future  was published in 2005.

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